Code Name Verity

Code Name Verity - Elizabeth Wein An incredibly powerful story of courage and friendship amidst the most trying and desperate of circumstances.

Set in World War II, it covers the adventures of two young women best friends--a pilot and a spy. One of them is captured by the Germans and interrogated. In return for a 2 week stay of her execution, she is to write a 'confession' and spill everything she knows to the Gestapo about the British war effort.

The first half of the book is the spy code named Verity's "confession". The second half of the book is told from the pilot's (Maddie) POV.

This isnt one of those books that just grabs you from the first page. Because of the circumstances under which it was written, the first part of the book (the confession) may not be very enjoyable or completely understandable. Verity isn't very likable--coming across as a coward and a traitor. It will take more than half the book to really get into it. But if you stick with it,the payoff is tremendous. The second part will clear up many things, and make everything worthwhile and make you want to go read the book all over again. I know this is a really vague review but to say more will spoil the plot.

There are so many layers to this story. Some actions/dialogue may seem out of place or implausible but eventually have a perfectly logical explanation. Only when you're almost done with the second part do you realize how expertly plotted the book was.

The characters will stay with you long after you're done. And if you re-read it again (especially the first part) immediately after, you'll get a whole new appreciation of the characters (Verity, Maddie, and even the 2 interrogators) and love them even more.

I had a few questions/observations about the book and this discussion in goodreads was very informative and enlightening. http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/977121-code-name-verity?page=1. The author popped in somewhere in the middle of the discussion to shed light on some plot 'issues'

P.S. This book is classified as YA but I find it will appeal to adults more because of the serious themes.